Lash Lifting – an alternative to lash extensions!

LASH LIFTING VS LASH PERMING

Lash lifting might be a something you are hearing a lot of lately, and others might be completely new to it. Lash lifting is a treatment that has technically been around for decades but in the last year or so it has really taken off. Lifting the lash is a great alternative to lash extensions as its using your own natural lashes and just enhancing them.

What is it?

Lash lifting is exactly what it sounds like. The lashes are curved or lifted to give the appearance of more fuller lashes. The treatment is done on your own lashes and it lasts approximately six weeks. Lash lifting is done the almost the same way as lash perming. Do you remember that beauty treatment from way back? Lash perming became popular in the eighties among other terrible head hair perms. The only difference between lash perming and lash lifting is the ‘curler’ that is used to give the lashes their curve or lift.

How is it done?

In lash perming a foam cylinderical rod is used. Think of a pool noodle, and now imagine I am perming a giant’s lashes. I place the noodle on top of the giant’s closed eyes and wrap the lashes around the rod. I use a temporary lash glue to make them adhere to the rod or noodle and then place perming solution on the lashes and wait approximately twenty mins until the solution has taken. Finally, I put a neutraliser on the lashes to prevent destruction of the natural lashes.  Voila` this giant woman is looking fi-fie-foe-fab-u-lous!

Whats the difference between lash perming and lash lifting?

Lash lifting is the same process except I am not using a foam rod I am using half a foam rod and this time its not foam its medical grade silicone. To put it simply imagine I am cutting the pool noodle in half down the length of the noodle. Now I have two half cylinders that are ‘C’ shapes and silicone, compared to an ‘ O’ shaped foam rod. Make sense?


Lash lifting uses the ‘C’ rod to perm rather that a whole O cylinder. The reason behind this is when perming a lash with an ‘O’ shaped rod you can loose a lot of the length of a persons’ lashes. If ‘C’ shaped rod is used the length remains and it gives a more natural effect just like it does if you curled your lashes at home with a lash curler. Sometimes lash perming can really curl a persons’ lashes and it doesn’t look as natural until a couple of weeks when it starts to loosen. Again it all depends on the therapist doing it and her training.

In both lash lifting and lash perming there are different sized curling rods available to suit the natural length of the clients lashes. It is up to the therapist to assess the client’s natural features and choose the appropriate sized ‘curler’.


Remember when I said lash lifting rods are not foam but medical grade silicone? Well they are made from this to be more sustainable. The silicone rods can be used over and over again, where as the foam perming rods were single use. Now before you start freaking out and think ‘eww someone else has had their lashes done with the rod their using on me!” Calm down. The silicone can be disinfected and sterilised in between uses just the same as tweezers, cuticle pushers, scissors and more. So when choosing a salon to go to I urge you, to ensure they are very clean, hygienic and have proper disinfection and sterilisation procedures in place. You should be able to gather this information by how it was with your previous treatments in that salon.
If it’s a salon you have never been to, you have the right to ask how they steralise the silicone rods in between clients.

It’s your body, your eyes and your health. 

Is it uncomfortable, painful or expensive?

All lash treatments should not be painful or uncomfortable. If your funny about people touching your eyes and having to lie with your eyes closed for twenty minutes then it may be uncomfortable for you. This is a very real anxiety some clients have, as beauty therapists we are aware and taught to understand this. Sometimes, we can help you through by allowing more appointment time to take it slower and distract you during the treatment.


Lash lifting can be expensive. It isn’t one of the most affordable products to stock in your salon so the price goes accordingly. The price range from cheapest to most expensive that I have seen in Melbourne is $60-$160.

Tips?

If I was going to have my lashes lifted or permed I would also have them tinted. Tinting is essentially dying the lashes with a colour that is made for eye and brow hairs. Its also completely safe. Tinting really gives you a proper alternative to lash extensions where  you don’t need any eye make up… Tinting your lashes a black or blue-black will make it look like you are wearing permanent mascara. If your someone who is lucky enough to have dark lashes then don’t be sad as you too can get a tint!  I tint many clients with naturally dark lashes and its because there is a noticeable difference between natural hair colour and black mascara looking lashes.

If you tint before you lift you can swim, go on holiday to a humid climate, have your honeymoon or just save time in the morning. If your one of those with sensitive eyes to mascara then lash lifting and tinting is for you. You will be able to have a fuller and darker set of lashes looking stunning for six to eight weeks and the best thing is, no more worry about annoying eye products!

Be sure to follow the pre and post lifting instructions your beauty salon tells you as it’s vital to the health of your lashes and the beautiful lift!

I hope you now have a further understanding of Lash lifting and perming. Both are permanent and both last approximately the same time as the lift/perm grows out with the natural lashes. It is a fantastic treatment and it’s one you should all try even if it’s for a special event or just because!

If you have any questions or you want further information don’t hesitate to email or comment below.

Until next time stay lashtastic.

Jayde xx

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